Singing Bach

So, I Googled “singing Bach” just for fun. I got lots of these:

Sebastian Bach performing at The Palladium in Worcester, MA on F

….and lots of these:

calendar-events-boys-choir-singing

….and a wonderful article about Kurt Elling, the great jazz singer:

ANNA WEBBER STUDIO ©2012

by  :

Though Kurt Elling is one of the most well-loved and highly praised jazz singers of our time, he first developed his chops singing Bach motets. As Elling returned to his native Chicago for performances at City Winery, he spoke about how classical music has influenced him throughout his life.

Though Elling confessed, “I never thought of a professional career in music,” becoming a musician was perhaps inevitable. His father was the music director of a Lutheran church in the Chicago suburbs, and music was always a part of his childhood. He began singing in his church choir, “starting with soprano, then alto, then tenor, and finally all the way to the bass. I was so happy to finally sing bass because that’s where the root is, that’s where the power is,” he said. He also sang with the Rockford Choral Union, and later, as a student at Gustavus Adolphus College, with the Gustavus Choir.

From singing in several choral groups, Elling was exposed to a broad range of repertoire including “12th century plainsong, crazy Norwegian composers, Duruflé, and Mozart, of course.” But as the son of a Lutheran music director, naturally, one of his favorite composers is the great Lutheran music director J.S. Bach. Elling has a particular fondness for Bach’s motets….

…Elling says that singing classical music can help any singer “develop your technique because it insists that you sing in tune and requires a lot of agility. The basic mechanisms of good singing are always going to be in play: good breath support, being able to move from very forceful and loud passages to very subdued and restrained and quiet passages, the ability to maneuver with dexterity among challenging intervals. Beyond pure technique, singing classical music teaches you about the structure of music, too. I learn so much about the structure of a piece by singing it.”…

… Though today jazz is Elling’s bread and butter, classical music has remained an important part of his life. “There’s nothing that compares to the emotional thrill and uplift that one receives from the greatest possible music. It doesn’t matter what kind of music it is. But there are few more powerful experiences or feelings of being fully alive, focused, and engaged than when I have been making music with a choir and orchestra.”

(http://blogs.wfmt.com/offmic/2016/05/16/how-grammy-award-winning-jazz-singer-kurt-elling-developed-his-chops-singing-motets-by-j-s-bach/)

 

The Heart of Motet No. 3

The heart of BWV 227, Jesu, meine Freude, is the chorale melody. The text was written by Johann Franck, the tune by Johann Crüger (below is some general information about both men). I am reminded of some of my favorite cooking shows, where the chef somewhat smugly announces that he has prepared “Salmon, three ways” – in this masterful motet, Bach sets the chorale melody 5 different ways in 6 of the 11 movements of the motet. You can hear the 1st and 3rd settings here, surrounding the magnificent 2nd movement, a setting of Romans 8: 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XVa3nR-2bVc

 

 

Johann Fran(c)k (June 1, 1618 – June 18, 1677) was a German politician, mayor of Königsberg and a member of the Landtag of Lower Lusatia, a lyric poet and hymnist. Under the influence of the Silesian School and of Simon Dach of Königsberg, he produced a series of poems and hymns, collected and edited by himself in two volumes (Guben, 1674), entitled: Teutsche Gedichte, enthaltend geistliches Zion samt Vaterunserharfe nebst irdischem Helicon oder Lob-, Lieb-, Leidgedichte, etc.. His secular poems are forgotten; about forty of his religious songs, hymns, and psalms have been kept in the hymals of the German Protestant Church. Some of these are the hymn for Communion Schmücke dich, o liebe Seele (Deck thyself, my soul, with gladness), which Bach used as the base for his chorale cantata Schmücke dich, o liebe Seele, BWV 180, the Advent hymn Komm, Heidenheiland, Lösegeld (Come, Ransom of our captive race, a translation into German of Veni redemptor gentium), and a hymn to Jesus, “Jesu, meine Freude” (Jesus, my joy), which was the base for Bach‘s funeral motet Jesu, meine Freude, BWV 227. Bach also used single stanzas in his cantatas. [Wikipedia]

Crüger, Johann, was born April 9, 1598, at Gross-Breese, near Guben, Brandenburg. After passing through the schools at Guben, Sorau and Breslau, the Jesuit College at Olmütz, and the Poets’ school at Regensburg, he made a tour in Austria, and, in 1615, settled at Berlin. There, save for a short residence at the University of Wittenberg, in 1620, he employed himself as a private tutor till 1622. In 1622 he was appointed Cantor of St. Nicholas’s Church at Berlin, and also one of the masters of the Greyfriars Gymnasium. He died at Berlin Feb. 23, 1662. Crüger wrote no hymns, although in some American hymnals he appears as “Johann Krüger, 1610,” as the author of the supposed original of C. Wesley’s “Hearts of stone relent, relent” (q.v.). He was one of the most distinguished musicians of his time. Of his hymn tunes, which are generally noble and simple in style, some 20 are still in use, the best known probably being that to “Nun danket alle Gott” (q.v.), which is set to No. 379 in Hymns Ancient & Modern, ed. 1875. [hymnary.org]

First Open Rehearsal – a big success and lots of fun!

We held our first Open Rehearsal of the season last night. Lots of newcomers joined us, and we had a Full House!

We read through a good portion of the Bach in the first half, and then read through a bit of the Gjielo in the second half. All such beautiful music!

The choir sounded great, considering most everyone was sight reading the pieces for the first time. Anne led the rehearsal with lots of fun and interesting musical interpretations about each piece, and kept the choir on their toes.

We have two more Open Rehearsals for the next two Mondays, for anyone to come and try us out. You’ll have fun while learning to sing some beautiful music.

Come Sing With Us !!